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Table 2 Contextual information of the studies included in QES

From: University students’ representations of Europe and self-identification as Europeans: a synthesis of qualitative evidence for future policy formulation

Contributing studiesSetting and population
Byram et al. (2017)Luxembourg; student-researchers in Psychology, Law, Linguistics, History, Sociology, Sociolinguistics, and Education Sciences.
Du Bois-Reymond (1998)Germany, The Netherlands and the UK; students enrolled in education and/or social work degrees.
Erling (2007)Germany; German students and international students from Bulgaria, France, Hungary, Korea and Poland, studying English at a German university. The latter comprise both foreign students and students on official European or international exchanges.
Fernández (2005)The UK; European undergraduate students on exchange programmes such as Erasmus and postgraduates on master’s or PhD programmes.
Fuss and Grosser (2006)Selected European regions: Spain (Madrid and Bilbao), Austria (Vienna and Bregenz), UK (Manchester and Edinburgh), Germany (Chemnitz and Bielefeld), Czech Republic (Prague) and Slovakia (Bratislava); representative samples of 18–24 years residents versus samples of resident peers engaged in Europe-oriented work or study.
Genova (2016)The UK; Undergraduate and postgraduate Bulgarian students enrolled in universities in London, Wales, Scotland, Southwest England the Midlands and Northern England.
Grundy 2007Scotland and the UK; representative sample of 18–24 years residents versus a sample of resident peers engaged in Europe-oriented work or study.
Hadfield and Summerby-Murray (2015)Institute for European Studies (Brussels, Belgium); graduate students (a dozen different EU citizenships)
Licata (2003)Belgium; French-speaking Belgian Psychology students.
Osler (1998)The UK and Denmark; student teachers from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Finland, Spain and Sweden.
Pollmann (2007)Germany; prospective history and social studies teachers from two German teacher education colleges.
Ros et al. (2008)Check and Slovak Republics, Germany and Spain; European youngsters; students of European and International Law or Philology; workers at multinational companies.
Spannring et al. (2008)Selected European regions: Spain (Madrid and Bilbao), Austria (Vienna and Bregenz), UK (Manchester and Edinburgh), Germany (Chemnitz and Bielefeld), Czech Republic (Prague) and Slovakia (Bratislava); representative samples of 18–24 years residents versus samples of resident peers engaged in Europe-oriented work or study.
Sperling (2013)Spain; Young adults of Latin American-immigrant descent (Dominican and Colombian), either arrived in the country of residence by or before age 12 or born in the country of residence.
Thorpe (2008)Scotland; Scottish representative sample of 18–24 years residents versus a sample of resident peers engaged in Europe-oriented work or study.
Udrea (2013)Romania; Romanian students who have recently completed or are about to complete their university studies in the UK
Van Mol (2013)Nine universities in Austria, Belgium, Italy, Norway, and Poland; students of Social and Political Sciences, Language Studies, Economics and Business Studies, and Engineering.
Wilkins et al. (2010)Turkey and the UK; student teachers enrolled in 3 Turkish universities and Leicester University in the UK.